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of journalist cokie roberts. yesterday members of the house gave tributes to the louisiana democrat. lindy boggs was 97. >> speaker, i rise today to pay tribute to a former member of the house and a grand lady from louisiana, ms. lindy boggs. she was a pioneer for the state of louisiana, and she served louisiana's second congressional district following death of her late husband who was then the majority leader of the house. she was the first woman elected to represent the state of louisiana in congress, and she was a founder of the congresswomen's caucus, and in tribute to her service as a pioneer for women, the women -- congressional women's reading room is rightfully named in her honor down the hall. lindy was the first woman and only louisiana ambassador to the holy sea during the tenure of pope john paul ii. lindy effortlessly balanced her role as a respected leader and a loving mother. she loved her city of new orleans, in fact, lived on bourbon street for many of her later years in new orleans. she loved her beloved tulane university and, in fact, just recently she and her daughter partic
of his relationship with his wife, france, and parishioners in louisiana. this is about an hour. >> it is truly a pleasure to be with you. i cannot get a high enough or strong enough appreciation for the great turnout. thank you. you have been with me from the very beginning. if chammy great kindness. it would not -- but would not have to talk about it very much longer for me to tear up. thank you. thank you. i am every day amazed -- i am amazed at how many things that were lost have been replaced. and is intellectually people are stepping up to replace all of those little lost during this throughout my life. so thank you for that. thank you. give yourself a round of applause for that place. [applause] i am going to try to read rather quickly. if you have your bibles with you -- [laughter] i don't know if i have read in public without having to say that. so bear with me. you know anything about me, and he should know probably more than you want to if you have read the book, you know that i am not the world's best reader. probably the world's worst speller. i was the child sittin
relationship with his wife friend and parishioners into ridder louisiana. this is about an hour. >> it's a pleasure to be with you and i can't give a high enough or strong enough appreciation for the great turnout. thank you. you have been with me from the very beginning. you have shown me great kindness and i'll wouldn't have talked about it much longer for me to tear up so thank you. every day i am amazed, amazed at how many things that were lost and it seems like truly everyday people like yourselves are stepping up to replace all of those little lost trinkets throughout my life that i have collect did so thank you for that. so give yourselves a round of applause for that please. [applause] so i'm going to try to read rather quickly. you have your bibles with you. [laughter] i don't know if i have read in public without having to say that so bear with me. if you know anything about me and you should know probably more than you want to if you have read the book, you will know that i'm not the world's best reader and probably the world's worst speller. i was the child sitting in the t
there was a sort of forgot about. >> guest: it is shocking. what is interesting about the situation in louisiana and why just write about it is that there is a budget crisis. and this is something being experienced all across the country in the last five years. but with shrinking budgets, you know, one of the places is the public defenders office. so in new orleans what happened was they were forced to lay off one third of the lawyers. so one whole division, conflicts vision. it means if there are two people arrested for robbing a 7-eleven, one gets the public defenders office, but because they could be accusing each other, you need a separate lawyer. so when no new orleans they had a separate division and they completely got rid of that and the budget cuts. so anyone who came in with multiple arrests like that, they had no attorneys. so they were just sitting in jail for months and months and judges were making please. they were scrambling, threatening to let people out of jail without a trial because this was such a clear violation of their rights. it was a fiasco fischer. >> host: in the same
in louisiana race in what, still feels there is injustice in america and besides the picture bridget concludes this way, america talks about the founding fathers as if they were not slavers who also sold their black children because of the color of their skin. what country has moved on with totally quality for blacks where a man can be a man? >> guest: many countries have. one of the great conflict of living where i live is i don't feel the burden of that. that social mobility is quite accessible and it is a wonderful space and wonderful democracy and it shows what great qualities can come to small don know how to answer that question about america. i do think the power as frederick douglass says, concedes nothing without a demand, never has and never will. it is probably true advantage once gained expresses itself in an effort to maintain itself. and peoples then learn not to know each other so as to be able to dismiss steeple's sufferings that they have relegated to another place unseen to them and so perhaps that is what happens. i can't begin to guess what it is like on the other side. i u
discombobulated. he had a sign announcing a restaurant and pub miles. his parents were from louisiana. he lived in the projects in san diego. during his two years in the army either missouri are the base and comenius certain places were off-limits to blacks and that many of his white comrades dismissed and simply because of the color of the skin. he felt his head jerked back snapping him back to the test at hand and the appendage would be a lousy outcome for many reasons to my including the damage it would surely do to his new 64 chevy malibu super sport with his wire rims front seat council. to his dismay the rest area was closed for construction, but it was later denied that he was dead tired. to keep going would be foolish. after surveying the scene and figuring out what was said he steered his super sport of the side of the construction site, turning up the engine and leaning back in a seat. the 44 caliber service revolver was within easy reach within the sheet and then fell fast asleep. he will have to buy the book to find out what happened to end. i did. in one of the perils of writing no
of louisiana. his parents migrated to america from india six months before he was born. he was typical of guests at the white house that night. the ostensible purpose of the evening was to honor the indian prime minister, the event also served as a barometer for how far and how fast an immigrant group had risen. in one generation indian americans had bolted from outsiders to will facets of american society. if from the google wanted to make small talk on the security line with the fortune 500 ceo he could tease jeff immelt who was born and bred -- if he wanted to bask in a reflective glow of a pea -- tp presenter did chat with the correct. hollywood was represented at the event. steven spielberg and the indian director of the $0.06 whose birthplace was in india were in attendance that night. as one of the pioneering indian success stories in the united states he knew all the indian entities and as the mackenzie legend in hot spots too. he had worked with many and served as a mentor to others. when the principal deputy solicitor general was in high school and getting pressure from his i
, first of all, made possible the louisiana purchase because that poll began was -- thatnapoleon was done with the empire as a result of the humiliating defeat. secondly, after haiti, after that revolution, the north atlantic slave trade was ended by britain and the united. and the last sort of breadth of that was the end of the civil war. one of the great story of history. >> host: this month on booktv in-depth program author and activist randall robinson. he's the author of five non-fiction books. here they are. what is transafrica? >> guest: transafrica is or the organization that i began in 1976 to galvanize african-american opinion on foreign policy issues. particularly issues that concern the black world. u.s. policy africa, the caribbean, and latin america. so transafrica, of course, of the organization that used instrumentality to galvanize american opposition to apartheid . for the set of sanctions that president reagan vetoed was overridden by republican controlled senate because of the work we did and the millions we organized to make a difference. that coupled with the great w
of them. he was from louisiana. he worked in the railroads for a while as a porter. when i met him, he was -- he had a water pump here and a little pecan tree, and he was cutting down the pecan tree to burn fire to keep himself warm. he was five-foot-five, sleeping on a little iron crate. the crate was too small for him, so he had a wooden beekeeper's box for his head. there were -- i'll looking inside, and there were veinna sausage cans, empty ones, that had had put in the corners to keep the place from falling. literally, chickens have a better roost than had did, and this is where he was living. he came, you know, we found him a half century later, and he was nervous, thought we were government workers here to maybe inspect the house, shut it down, whatever. i said, new york city we're -- i said, no, we're here to tell his story. we're standing in the old lake basin. it was the biggest body of fresh water west of the mississippi, 800 square miles of lake right here in the middle of california, and these cotton grower from the south, chased out by the bull weevil came west, and they
of them. he was from louisiana. he worked in a row boats for a while porter. when i met him, he had a little water pump year and a little pecan tree and he was cutting down the pecan tree to burn fire to keep himself warm. he was five-foot five site.iron crate. the iron crate was too small, so he had to beekeepers box for his head. i remember looking inside and there were vienna sausage cans, empty ones that he put in the credit saves to keep the place from falling. chickens have a better roost than he did. this is where he was living. we found and a half a century later and he was paribas. he thought we were government workers here to maybe inspect the house, shut it down, whatever. i told them no, we were here to tell his story. standing in the old to the relay could be said was the biggest body of freshwater west of the mississippi, 800 square miles right here in the middle of california. these cotton growers from the south were chased out by the bull weasel, came last and they claim this land, this blakely and. they took the rivers and dams them and shoved to the flow to places
louisiana is cut away. you can't get there anymore. so all their supplies, all the food and all the manpower is coming from the mississippi through the confederacy coming eastbound. it doesn't happen anymore. they can't cross the river. big union controls the river. the other thing is vicksburg is a rail hub. the railroad coming from the east stops at the river in vicksburg and from there it points west -- from points west that stops. now the union army controls the railroad and they cut it off. you can't underestimate the power of rivers and roberts during the civil war. they didn't have interstate highways. they didn't have trucks. these rivers and railroads and the union army by capturing vicksburg stops all of that and the whole part of the country. the other part of this is now the mississippi river is wide open for the union army to use and the union navy to use to transport material meant food equipment, so whatever they need and to the south trade it very definitely is the beginning to the end for the confederacy and a lot of people in the confederacy know this. that is the history l
they are alive. the most terrible mine it was made in louisiana, exporter of the world, used all over the place, different countries. in a sense of these struggles will always return to where you are if you are interested in them. so what is the point of saying somebody joining the antitear gas movement? tear gas is extensively used. they would join the movement to end the revolution to ban teargassed. that is the legitimate international policy. but the politics you're thinking of that your guess is needed america, brazil -- i read the reports. it's in a handful of places and those are the places they have to assert themselves but that doesn't mean they are going to stop manufacturing teargas in the opportunity to the americans have band it and at the same time there has to be a cushion the global forum to have an international convention against teargassed here's the thing, there are conventions against most of these things. one has to fight -- i'm going to say this, it sounds idiotic but forgive me, we have to fight for the right of the international law and the importance of the internation
preparedness for the louisiana department of health and hospitals. that puts her smack in the middle of coordinating federal, state and local age is -- agencies and preparing for disasters of various types. she has a rich and varied background in health administration roles. she was around during the katrina days in louisiana and shy has been with the department more than 20 years. we're really pleased to have you with us today. >> make sure i've got this right. >> wait. more time. there you go. >> can you hear me? all right. well, good afternoon. i think i was one of the last panelists to be picked up on this very distinguished panel. so i thought, i would talk to you from what i know in terms of my strength is more in operations. usually i'm never at a loss for words. from an operations perspective. if you told me that, you told me the problem is katrina, dpus starve, rita, ike, the mississippi oil spill. recently tropical storm isaac last year. so some of the operation concerns that we have. if you said how will which evacuate half of our coastline in a 38-hour period i know who t
the haitian revolution, first of all, made possible in louisiana purchase because napoleon was done with it as a result of that humiliating defeat. secondedly, after haiti, after that revolution the north atlantic slave trade was ended by britain and the united states. and the last sort of breadth of that was the end of the civil war. americans know nothing about the story. we owe so much to those haitians, exslaves who defeated four of the most powerful army of the government in well twelve and a half year war. one of the great story in history. >> host: this month on booktv's in-depth program, author and activist randall robinson. he is the author of five non-fiction books. here they are. beginning in 1998. mr. robinson wrote "defending the spirit." finally an unbrokenning a any haiti from revolution to the kidnapping of a president. 202 is the area code if you like to dial in and participate in the conversation. you can contact us via e-mail booktv@c-span.org. or social media. you can make a comment on facebook.com/booktv. or send us a tweet@booktv is the twitter han dahl. what i
, whereas a mine will just kill ten people. that mine was made in louisiana, exported around the world, used in afghanistan, used all other the place, sold to different countries. in a sense, these struggles will always return to where you are if you are interested in them. see, what is the point of, say, somebody in mongolia joining anti-tear gas movement unless tear gas is extensively used in mongolia? that's how they are use -- join the movement to end tear gas use. let's have a u.n. resolution to ban tear gas. that is a legitimate international politics. but the politics that you're thinking of is that tear gas is made in the u.s., in brazil. what is it, five, six places? i read that report. basically, a handful of places. those are the places where the campaign has to assert itself. but that doesn't mean that tomorrow the indians are going to stop manufacturing tear gas. the americans have banned it, the brazilians have banned it. at the same time, there has to be a push in the global forum to have an international convention against tear gas. but here's the thing, there are internation
and german flak batteries. >> host: of world war ii veteran living in lafayette, louisiana. you're on book tv with author rick atkinson. >> caller: they misquoted you. i'm not a veteran of that war, but i wanted to pay tribute, if i could, to some dear friends of mine who are gone now his name is go down in history. they were very -- my engineer was one of the 802nd and 101st airborne paratroopers that was at normandie. on never forget the tears in his eyes when he said, yes, our nation was to take the guns. i lost about 100 of my friends doing so, and there were not even there. then he went to market garden where he was not mortally wounded because she lived through it, but seriously wounded in taking a bridge, the last bridge. and my uncle who was in patton's army throughout the campaign and lived through it and left his general but said this of his soldiers. we have a serious problem with people shooting themselves in the foot. he was actually incensed about it. that's why he slapped the man. he loved his general. he said a lot of our boys died, but not because we weren't fighting. >> host
'll catch those people who are here and violating the law -- >> host: our next call is mike from louisiana. independent line. good morning. >> caller: good morning. >> host: good morning, mike. >> caller: yeah. some of the points he makes, i need to get this man to go out and ask women to go out with me the way he seems to go any real problem you have so you can figure them out later. >> host: put that in the form of a question, we'll get a response. >> caller: okay. we'll start with a little bit of time that he's put on. he said that being -- there was no problem with having your own culture. that's all fine. i -- i'm from louisiana i'm supposed to be french-english but i don't wear a beret. the irish people only celebrate one day a year. they don't speak guy -- i have three or four more points. basically his points. >> host: thank you, mike. >> guest: first of all, there's nothing in our law that requires spanish or any other language to be spoken. you know, i watch spanningish--- spanish-language television 10% of the time. 90% of the time i'm watching english-language television or eng
, it's massachusetts. it's louisiana which is sort of unique in some ways. we'd all have a debate about whether it's good or bad, what's happening in louisiana. and that doesn't bring, the small school thing is in that mix. it's nested in that mix. what does a school day well? what would be better to farm out to a larger entity. you don't have a lot of that farming out in a lot of state digital have so much in california. you don't have so much in new jersey that superintendent sharing program is interesting, and hopefully someone will study that. but i think that's where you would want to move. are the things that a small school can do well, and then how large do the other entities have to get to take on certain tasks in order to be effective? >> again, i think your paper and the position that 105s doesn't fit all is right thing to take. interdistrict may work in some places, but then there has to be real choice if it's going to be the case but it has to be about quality and has to be about kids as opposed to the politics that we see floating around choice now. and the places that we w
to turn now to as prats who's the director of emergency preparedness for the louisiana department of health and hospitals. that puts her smack in the middle of coordinating among federal, state and local agencies that are dealing with and preparing for that disaster this type. she has a rich and various background and health administration roles. she was around during the katrina days and has been around the department more than 20 years. we are really pleased to have you with us today. >> be sure i've got this right. can you hear me? all right. well good afternoon. i think i was one of the last panelists to be picked up on this very distinguished panel. so i thought i would talk to you from what i know in terms of my strength is more in obligations. usually i never had a loss for words. from an operations perspective if you told me, you know, that the problem is katrina, rita, gustav, ike, the oil spill. they're some of the operation concerns we have. if you said okay how are we going to evacuate have the coast line and a 32 hour period i know who to go to and how long it's going
to take over black cities in louisiana doing the same thing in michigan. we will not have the kind of turnout we've had in previous years unless we take your -- make sure we add emergency managers and the suppressions. to the list of voter suppression. >> i would like to -- >> jo ann watson. >> yes, sir? >> counselwoman from detroit. give her a round of applause. we have to challenge the constitutionality of the emergency manager law, which suspends every elected official from voting. as he said himself, he's a benevolent dictator. [inaudible] right. we need to organize at the national level, because what is happening in michigan can happen -- >> emergency management. [inaudible] >> department of justice, i think, moving with us but they haven't acted on it yet. sorry to say. >> congressman john? >> we have similar things taking place in georgia in the dekalb county. the school board has been removed by the governor. he's replaced them with his own pick. and these kinds of moves have been sanctioned by the voters. so when they put constitutional amendments on the ballot, and they t
. >> thank you for this opportunity. my name is thomas and i'm from baton rouge, louisiana. you know, and i'm sitting here and i'm taking in a lot of the discussion. of course, i'm not necessarily as young as i look, but i've been around the pool of law. in fact, for a number of years we dealt with civil rights litigation in the state of louisiana, and as i sit here and look at the audience, and we're talking about what can we do today, the first thing we need to do is get young people here. you know, most of us who are sitting in this room are old enough to recognize what transpired. and we talk about social media and how do we get young people involved. we can't do anything, congressman lewis, if we don't have young people here at the table. let me tell you why. those of you who are not familiar to many of the laws that we have put in place today have actually boxed us in, as a community. you see right now, if you notice the election of congressman throughout the country, it happened because we created this multimember districts. a lot of which we can't change today, because we don't have
served in the u.s. army from 1989 to 1994 and was stationed in germany and fort polk, louisiana. dustin, the youngest of three sons, knew from an early age he wanted a military career. he'd been wanting to do that since he was a little boy about when he was 6 years old, darrell recalls. i encouraged him to do so, and he was a leader. he'd take the initiative to get things done. i've always raised my boys to do the right thing no matter if the cause was popular or unpopular. by the time he reached high school dustin was a top cadet in his junior rotc program. i remember him as a model student, very quiet, and serious. you always knew where he stood, says colonel mark jones of the air force junior rotc program at south laurel high school, dustin's alma mater. dustin rose to be his junior rotc unit's corps commander and the most decorated cadet.f pfc s shoong many -- shook many at south laurel high where dustin graduated in 2010 and had many friends. when i heard he died my legs almost collapsed. it was unbelievable. he was a good friend, a mentor and a truly good person says deafen burkha
energy. >> guest: louisiana i had a great trip there in a bipartisan delegation. there is such potential to open up and create jobs. when i talk about revenue generation. it's actually taking the amazing resources of natural gas and oil and also wind and the renewables and leveraging that inputting americans to work in changing lives and creating a revenue that we need for better roads and better schools. i think in washington we too often polarized either you are for the environment or for jobs or something like this and i just don't see it that way. we can do what has been done in the leasing and other areas, diversify the economy and great paying jobs. >> host: what specifically though are you talking about? >> guest: i ran on this opening up coast of virginia so we can drill and get to the natural resources that are there in an environmentally safe way. the governor ran on it and the general assembly wants it and the president the only thing holding us us back as chile demonstration. that is not a partisan comment but to the secretary of the interior they are not moving forward and e
to negotiate with a guy named napoleon bonaparte. he negotiated the louisiana purchase which doubled the size of the united states of america in 1804. teddy roosevelt was the first american to win the nobel peace prize because he mediated the russo japanese war in 1905. fdr's wartime diplomacy secured and allies for churchill, stalin. that was political to overcoming the power to president kennedy turned the diplomacy when the great majority of his advisers in october 1952 said use force. at the final moment president kennedy brokered a negotiated compromise with our greatest enemy, the soviet premier make you tricshelle, that's how the cuban missile crisis ended. that's why we didn't and centric hundreds of millions of people on the east coast, the midwest of united states and in europe, and in russia. because diplomacy rather than force triumphs. think of henry kissinger, still going strong at age 90 by the way, 40 years ago negotiate his brilliant opening to china that open up relations that have been frozen for the last 20 years prior, and insured a generation of peace between china and t
to rosanne prats, the director of emergency preparedness for the louisiana department of health and hospitals that puts it smack in the middle of coordinating among federal, state and local agencies that are dealing with and preparing for the disasters. she has a background in health administration rules and was around during the katrina days in louisiana and has been with the department for more than 20 years. we are pleased to have you with us today. >> make sure i've got this right. >> can you hear me? all right good afternoon. i think i was one of the last panelists to be picked up on this very distinguished panel. usually i never had a loss for words. from the operations perspective if you told me, you know, that the problem is katrina, read the, gustav, ike, the mississippi oil spill, recently tropical storm isaac. some of the concerns we have is how can we evacuate have the coast line in a 38 hour period i know who to go to and how long it is going to take. how many will be evacuated or not, how many can help themselves, how many will be the state's assistance, how many of those will n
and our disaster resilience series which cohosted with the pennington foundation of baton rouge, louisiana. for those of you interested in the series i would encourage you to visit our website, csis.org to learn more about those events including interviews and videos. natural disasters represent a significant challenge. on average we experience 10 severe weather events each year, exceeding $1 billion in damage. in the 1980s the annual average was only two such even events. in 2012 alone disastrous cost the u.s. an estimated $110 billion making it the second most costly year in disasters in recent decades. adjusting disasters and the cost goes will acquire us to -- our long-term efforts to build resilience for communities, businesses, government agencies and individuals are better prepared for and can recover more quickly and more fully from natural disasters. to discuss how we can make building and resilient nation more effective and more of a priority, we're joined today by dissing bush panel of experts. first i would like to introduce david heyman who'll be living a few opening remarks.
to as many as six or seven refineries from kansas, oklahoma, texas to louisiana. there is no doubt the vast majority of not 100% of the gasoline will be distributed within the united states and not put on. but there have been -- we do export diesel because we don't use it like europe does so we have had a symbiotic relationship. we send them our diesel and they send us our gasoline. so, that would continue. also some of the manufacturing products that are bipartisan from the oil that we don't use would be exported, too. those are actually healthy for our economy. >> host: in issue that does affect nebraska but you don't necessarily think of it when you talk about immigration. how does it affect nebraska and where are you personally on emigration? >> guest: it does affect nebraska. we have a lot of plants and agriculture but to rely on and we have had a good share of immigrants in both omaha and my district as well as other cities throughout nebraska so we need reform and make them attack that issue. where i am and i think this is the consensus of the republican conference, too. it's hard to
the louisiana purchase which doubled the size of united states of america in 1804. teddy roosevelt was the first american to win the nobel peace brise -- prize because he mediated in 19 50s. that was critical to overcome the act of power. president kennedy turned the diplomacy when the great majority of the advisers in october of 1962, said use force. at the final moment, president kennedy brokered a negotiated comprise with our greatest enemy the soviet. that's how the cuban missile crisis ended. that's how we didn't destroy hundreds and millions of people on the east coast, in europe, and russia. because diplomacy rather than force triumphed. henry kissinger going strong at the age of 90, by the way, forty years ago, negotiated his brilliant opening to china that opened up relations that have been frozen football the last twenty years prior and insure -- ensured a jen generation of peace. think of president bush. a lot of people think he was the most established. he had are vast experience as a diplomat, he had faith in diplomacy, he had achieved the unification of germany in nato after the en
in the south like louisiana, mississippi. you know, what's happening in some of those states in terms of -- is that helping or hurting? >> that's a really important point. this is kind of one of the interesting demographic changes in america over the last 25 years. richard vedder is the expert on this who you'll hear from later. traditionally, immigrants have shunned the south other than texas. in fact, that's been a problem for growth in the south for a hundred, since the end of the civil war. now you're seeing dixie attracting the immigrant states like north carolina. one of the states that has had the biggest percentage increase in immigration over last 15 years has been georgia. and georgia actually has become a high growth state. and this gets to the point people ask are immigrants more attracted to a state that has high welfare went fits -- benefits or to a state that has jobs. and so we rooked at some of -- we looked at some of this evidence, and what we found was on balance immigrants are much more likely to go to states with low unemployment rates than they are to go to the s
's a shocking story. there two people in louisiana just in jail for months and months sort of languishing simply forgotten about. i found shocking. >> guest: yeah. it's shocking. what is interesting about new orleans and the situation in louisiana and why i choose to write about that was that their budget crisis. it's something being experienced across the country in the last five years, but with shrinking budgets, you know, one of the places that on the chopping block fairly early in the process is public defenders office. so in new orleans, what happened was the public defender the chief public defender was forced to lay off a third of lawyers. one whole division, which is called the conflicts division, and con flingts means if there's two people arrested for say robbing a seven eleven. one gets public defenders' office. because they might be accusing each other, being the one who fired the gun or whatever. you need a separate lawyer. and so in new orleans, they had a conflicts division. it was a separate division. they completely got rid of that in the budget cuts. so anybody then that came i
the louisiana purchase which doubled the size of the united states of america in 1804. teddy roosevelt was the first american to win the nobel peace prize to kasim mediated to russo-japanese war in 1905. fdr's wartime to pomc sera carried an alliance with churchill in stalin. president kennedy turned the diplomacy to win the great majority of his advisers and october 1962 saying use force at the final moment president kennedy brokered a negotiated compromise with our greatest enemy the soviet premier nikita khrushchev and that is how the cuban missile crisis ended and that is why we didn't incinerate hundreds of millions of people on the east coast in the midwest united states and in europe and russia because diplomacy rather than force triumphed. think of henry kissinger still going strong at age 90 by the way, 40 years ago negotiated his brilliant opening to china that opened up relations that have been frozen for the last 20 years prior and ensured a generation of peace between china and the united states rethink the president george h.w. bush, wash 41. a lot of people think he was
california or new york but louisiana, mississippi. >> that is the important point the interesting immigration graphic you would hear from the experts later but traditionally immigrants have shunned the south of man has been a problem that now use the dixie's like north carolina wednesday with the biggest percentage increase is georgia. that has become the high-growth state to the point where people ask our immigrants more attracted to a state with high welfare benefits or to the state that has jobs? what we have found is on balance democrats are more likely to go to low unemployment rates than with high welfare benefits which is the important timing because people are coming here because they want a job the. >> and it does make sense if you leave your country. >> it does make sense but there is so many people on the other side of this issue that the immigrants come here for welfare. some do but the vast majority do not. >> a very important point. >> so now with the international experts the author of a chapter of the bush institutes solutions looking at growth and immigration and evidence she
of louisiana is cut away. you cannot get there in more. and so all those supplies, the food, the manpower coming from the mississippi to the confederacy coming east stops. does not happen anymore. union controls the river. the other thing is the expert is of real hope. the growth coming from the east stopped at the river. things would come back for. that stopped because now the union army controls the railroad . they cut it on. you cannot underestimate the power of rage and real rooms during the civil war. it'd have trucks. it was reason gallons. the union army by capturing expert stops all that from that whole part of the country. the other part of this is now the mississippi river is wind up for the union army to use, the union need be used to transport material, man, food, equipment, whatever they needed to the south. it very definitely is the beginning of the end for the confederacy. a lot of people in the confederacy know this. there are "the book to that effect, but that is the history lesson. you have people like john pemberton. he is not a favorite sun. in fact, he's not a sign at
the 1990s. i happened to be teaching in louisiana at the time, and david duke, anybody remember him? nearly became governor of the state, and my daughter was six months old, and i decided to get active in the community to stop the kkk/nazis from taking over the state i was living in. i became active then with the national organization for women because the commit to the sexism, racism, home phobia, racism, all the isms, connect the dots. they are intertwined, cannot be pulled apart. i've. talking to -- we have been talking to colleagues in the weeks and days leading up to this very lunchon, and one of the things we talked about is the four themes of the 50th anniversary march on washington, and that would be freedom and jobs and peace and social justice. when you look at those issues and ask yourself, gosh, what is the impact on women of those things, and then you ask you're, huh, what is the impact on various communities of women, what is the impact on african-american women; what is the impact on immigrant women, latinas; what about younger women; what about older women? if we ask the que
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